April 27, 2016

Board of Directors

 President: Kathy Cole was born and raised in Grayson County and graduated from Emory & Henry College, then earned a masters in psychology at Hollins College and a PhD at the University of Oregon. She worked for the Department of Veterans Affairs for 30 years as a psychologist, leadership educator, and manager of a leadership education center. Named in 1987 as a Kellogg National Fellow, Kathy traveled abroad and saw diverse examples of grassroots leadership.

She moved back to the area in 2009 and has been active in Grayson LandCare since 2010, serving as Secretary for four years before her election as President in 2014. She raises funds for Grayson LandCare at the Independence Farmers Market through plant sales and serves as a hub of information for market-goers on our organization and current activities and events. Kathy is an avid gardener, sings in Highland Camerata and is active in the Church of the Good Shepherd.


Vice President: Charlotte Hanes graduated from East Carolina University where she was a member of the Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society. She was a practicing physical therapist at NC Memorial Hospital, Chapel Hill and Methodist Hospital in Houston.  Charlotte became Director of the Physical Therapy Department at A.P. Memorial Hospital, Reidsville, NC in 1978 and a partner with Rockingham Orthopedic Associates in 1981.

She is currently president and CEO of River Ridge Cattle Company, a 1500-acre farm located along the New River in southwest Virginia’s Grayson County specializing in naturally raised beef and organic berries.  The farm serves as a demonstration of livestock production for the region’s cattle farmers and is an on-going research partner with Virginia Tech.

Charlotte is a founder of Grayson LandCare, which originated in Australia and is now in over 14 countries around the world.  She is also a board member of Rachel’s Network, www.rachelsnetwork.org., a national organization located in Washington, DC, dedicated to creating a network of women conservation funders and to be an influential voice for the environment.


Director: Michelle Pridgen grew up in the Research Triangle area of North Carolina. She earned a BA in East Asian Studies from UNC-CH and an AA in General Agriculture from NCSU. She worked as an extension technician doing vegetable research and as part of the horticultural team at WRAL while living in Raleigh. Michelle and her husband Don bought land in Grayson County in 1984 that would become Windyhill Farm. They formed Windyhill Logworks and traveled the country building log homes for 20 years. She has served as secretary for Grayson LandCare and was hired as Director in 2020. Michelle has been the manager of the Independence Farmers Market since 2013. She continues in that position and grows produce and flowers for the Market.

Her goal is to help increase the success of local agriculture. To that end she has serves on various boards and has worked with Blue Ridge Woodland growers and Appalachian Sustainable Development’s Herb Hub to determine the feasibility of woodland medicinals.


Treasurer: Anita Simpson was born and raised in Grayson County, learning gardening and canning skills from her mother. She moved away after graduating from college and worked nearly 40 years in various office positions, including 20 years as the assistant to the president and board of trustees at a community college in Maryland. She managed large budgets in each of her positions and after retirement worked as part-time office manager at a nonprofit where she was responsible for all financial recordkeeping

She and her husband moved permanently to Grayson in 2015 where they grow a market garden and sell produce and various canned goods at the Independence Farmers Market. Anita is particularly interested in herb and flower gardening; experimenting with various canning recipes; and is active in the Church of the Good Shepherd, serving on the Vestry/Council and singing in the choir.


Communications Director:  Matthew Greene was born in North Wilkesboro, North Carolina.  Always a lover of the mountains, he moved to Grayson County in 2007  and opened a custom frame shop in Independence.  Since then, his appreciation for the beauty and splendor of the Appalachian mountains has only grown.  He is reminded daily of how magical they are, and how fragile.

His interests include gardening of all types, canning and preserving food, land stewardship, learning new things on nearly any subject, and playing handbells with the New River Bell Ensemble.  

In addition to the frame shop, he cares for and helps run Ward Manor, a bicentennial farm and events venue, with his spouse Michael Jenkins.


Past President: Danny Boyer has thirty years experience in conservation planning and implementing conservation practices, and extensive experience in planning, managing and promoting intensive grazing systems and the installation of infrastructure required for efficient operation. He is Farm Owner-Operator, Grazing Consultant, Water System Specialist USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service, Galax, Virginia (retired), where he designed and supervised the installation of more than 6,000 farm watering systems.

Danny has served on a wide variety of boards and committees including the Board of Directors of the Virginia Forage and Grassland Council; advisor to the Carroll Grayson Cattle Producers Association; Grayson County Extension Leadership Council; Galax High School Agricultural Council; president of Grayson County Farm Bureau; Chair of Grayson LandCare Processing Committee; Southwest Virginia Agricultural Association Crops Committee; and Charter Member and President of Grayson LandCare. Danny Boyer was awarded the 2013 Forage Person of the Year by the Virginia Forage and Grassland Council.


At-Large: Heidi Breedlove grew up in upstate NY in a big family. She camped and backpacked all over the US and always thought she would settle somewhere people went to to get away from it all. After living in Oregon, Kentucky and rural New York, the Breedlove family built a home in Mouth of Wilson in 1981 where she raised 2 kids and fostered others. She has an AAS in MLT and Veterinary Assisting and graduated from WCC as an RN. She worked 20 years in local communities as a home health nurse and a health department nurse. She remains very tied to the earth and community and has raised horses, cows, goats, pigs and chickens through the years, and now is a beekeeper. An avid organic gardener for 40 plus years, she and husband Brent put up lots of produce, fish and venison yearly. Heidi has volunteered with Land Care in various capacities, area schools and BRDC. Now retired, she hikes and camps whenever possible and spends time with grandkids.


At-Large: Michael David Jenkins was raised in Independence, Virginia. After graduating from Grayson County High School in 1989 he attended Emory and Henry College where he earned a B.A. in Spanish and English. During this time he also attended La Universidad de San Juan Evangelista in Madrid, Spain. Afterward, he attended Virginia Polytechnic and State University where he earned a Masters of Arts in Education with a focus on Curriculum and Instruction. Upon graduating from Virginia Tech, he began his teaching career in Stokes County, NC as a Spanish teacher. He leads student and adult groups to Costa Rica, Perú, and Western Europe to experience cultural diversity, history, and current environmental conservation practices, eco-tourism opportunities, and alternative energy efforts.

In addition to his teaching profession, Michael opened in 2003 and still operates with his husband, Matthew Greene, Ward Manor Events Venue on the family farm. Being the shepherd of this Bicentennial Farm is his joy. He eagerly awaits the arrival of his retirement when he may be afforded the opportunity to more enjoy his hobbies of vegetable and flower gardening, and looks forward, at that time, to being a regular vendor at the Independence Farmerś Market.


At-Large: Arwen Cayton was raised in a small town in Upstate NY, named Stamford. Her family lived on the remains of an old dairy farm, where she learned the skills she uses today as Director of Matthews Living History Museum. She create events, manages the museums farm and take care of the archieves. Arwen  and her husband Wayne are both Army Veterans. She was an Animal Technician which has also provided useful skills for the Museum and in the operation of Cranberry Acre, a diverse 1 acre farm with a farm store.  Serving on the GLC board allows Arwen to act as a bridge for both organizations to facilitate working together on community projects.

 



At-Large: Jay Dunbar (aka The Berry Man) relocated from Winston-Salem, NC to Grayson County in 2015 to become Director of Operations for River Ridge Organics, a sustainable fruit company.

Jay’s passion for the local food movement, rural entrepreneurship, and community development are a great asset to LandCare. He is also an experienced event producer, writer, and educator. 


Ex Officio: Jerry Moles: Jerry MolesFaculty University of California, Davis and Pomona College; Invited Lecturer University of California, Berkeley and Stanford University;  Community organizer, Action For Appalachian Youth (Kanawa County, West Virginia); Co-founder, NeoSynthesis Research Centre, Ltd., (NSRC) (Sri Lanka) developing financially beneficial and environmentally sensitive enterprises; Founding Board Member, Watershed Research & Training Center Inc., Hayfork, California developing collaborative ventures among local entrepreneurs, state and federal agencies, local governments, and financiers; Founder, Grayson LandCare, Inc.; Founding Board Member, SustainFloyd, Inc., and International Analog Forestry Network (Costa Rica); and on advisory boards and committees to the Secretariat for International Landcare, Ltd. (Australia) and at Virginia Tech the Appalachian Foodshed Project, Virginia Beginning Farmer & Rancher Coalition, and Center for Natural Resource Evaluation and Decision Support.  Wrote the successful proposal and organized meetings in South America and Australia for the United Nations effort in protecting global natural resources to include the world’s indigenous peoples.